Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-settings.php on line 512

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-settings.php on line 527

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-settings.php on line 534

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-settings.php on line 570

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Page::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1199

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_PageDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1244

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Category::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1391

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_CategoryDropdown::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/classes.php on line 1442

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class wpdb in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/wp-db.php on line 306

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/cache.php on line 103

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Object_Cache in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/cache.php on line 431

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/query.php on line 61

Deprecated: Assigning the return value of new by reference is deprecated in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/theme.php on line 1109

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::start_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::start_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::end_lvl() should be compatible with Walker::end_lvl(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::start_el() should be compatible with Walker::start_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Declaration of Walker_Comment::end_el() should be compatible with Walker::end_el(&$output) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/comment-template.php on line 1266

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Dependencies in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/class.wp-dependencies.php on line 31

Strict Standards: Redefining already defined constructor for class WP_Http in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/http.php on line 61

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-settings.php:512) in /home/wildabou/public_html/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
Wild About Chickens http://wildaboutchickens.net and most other barnyard animals Sun, 17 May 2009 02:27:41 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.7 en hourly 1 Day Old Chicks http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=200 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=200#comments Sat, 16 May 2009 18:54:07 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=200
These are one to three day old chicks hatched from our own eggs. They are a cross between a Bard Rock Rooster and Rhode Island Red Hens. They are not sex linked so the color does not indicate the sex of the chick. It will be interesting to see what they look like when thier feathers come in.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=200
Counting our Chickens as they Hatch http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=191 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=191#comments Thu, 14 May 2009 21:33:20 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=191 We started incubating our eggs on April 22 after letting the incubator come to 99.5 oC and 60% humidity. 19 days later the first eggs started to hatch and on the 21st day the entire hatch was complete.

The first of our Bard Rock Rhode Island Red chicks to hatch

The first of our Bard Rock Rhode Island Red chicks to hatch

We started with 40 eggs and 23 of them have hatched. This is a slightly better than 50% hatch rate. Some of the eggs were stored for more than two weeks which is a long time to store eggs for hatching. We might have gotten a better hatch rate if the eggs were stored for a week or less.

We were surprised that the eggs started hatching on the 19th day. The books I have read about chickens and artificail incubation say that chicks hatch early if the temperature is slightlytoo high and that these chicks usually have problems with their leggs and never walk correctly. We monitored the temperature closely and while it did rise to temperatures over 100 oC on occasion, for the most part the temperature hovered around 99.5 oC throughought the incubation process. Since our chicks appear to be doing fine I wunder if the hens started the development process on some of the eggs before I collected them for storage.

In any case we now have 23 chicks from a Bard Rock rooster and Rhode Island Red hens. Most of them are black. some have small patches of white on their heads like Bard Rock chicks and some are yellow/orange (lighter orange than Rhode Island Red chicks).

Some of the newly hatched chicks after they have dried off

Some of the newly hatched chicks after they have dried off

It will be interesting to see what their feathers are like when they develope.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=191
Building the New Coop Part 2 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=175 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=175#comments Sat, 25 Apr 2009 01:08:19 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=175 Tuesday April 22 our friend and neighbor Brad Meyer of Meyer Mountain Farms continued to help us construct our new coop. On this day we put the metal roofing on,

Brad Meyer Screwing the first peice of metal foofing in place

Brad Meyer screwing the first piece of metal roofing in place

marked the siding where the opening to the nesting boxes will be,

Marking the location where the opening to the nesting boxes will be.

Marking the location where the opening to the nesting boxes will be.

cut out the opening for the nesting boxes,

Brad is using a circular saw set 1/4 " depth to cut out the siding.

Brad is using a circular saw set 1/4 " depth to cut out the siding.

and framed up the nesting boxes.

Attaching 2" x4" lunber across studs around nesting box opening

Attaching 2" x4" lumber across studs around nesting box opening

Constructing the rest of the nesting box fram to the building

Constructing the rest of the nesting box frame

Gerald lifts the framed lid on the framed nesting box.

Gerald lifts the framed lid on the framed nesting box.

There is still a lot of work to do but we will be on our own from here. Brad is a good teacher when we finish the nesting box and start on the second one we will see if we are good students.
]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=175
Incubating Our Own Eggs http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=168 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=168#comments Wed, 22 Apr 2009 15:27:30 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=168 In a previous post I talked about buying an incubator and saving eggs for hatching. We managed to collect 48 clean medium sized nicely shaped eggs and put them into the incubator today (April 22 2009). For several days we monitored the temperature and the humidity in the incubator to make sure that we had the thermostat set correctly and the correct amount of water available in the reservoir. The temperature holds steady between 99.5oC and 100.5oC but we had some trouble maintaining a relative humidity of 60 to 62 %. We thought we had the humidity correct this morning but after putting the eggs in the humidity inside the incubator rose to 70%. I opened the vents to allow warm moist air to escape and went to work. We shall see what happened when we get home.
If all goes well our chicks will begin to hatch 21 days from now on May 13 2009. Since we have a commercial order for chicks in and are expecting them to arrive May 11th we should be able to integrate any of our chicks which hatch successfully with the flock of bard rock chicks coming from Murray McMurray Hatchery and brood them all together.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=168
Building the New Coop http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=143 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=143#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2009 01:06:32 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=143

April 14 2009 we started the construction of our new chicken coop. The original plans for this coop were featured in a previous blog. I mention them now because we have been modifying our plans as we go along and I am not sure how close to my original idea we will be in the end. Gerald, my husband has been coming home from work as early as he can to work on the coop. The first day he constructed a base on two pressures treated 4” x 4”s. The base is a rectangle 4” x 12” made out of 2” x 4” boards with 2” x 4” boards running across the rectangle covered by 1 and ½ pieces of 4’ x 8’ sheets of plywood. So far this matches the original plans. My sister-in-law Cindy recently had a chicken palace build by a carpenter. She had her floor covered in linoleum. I had read about using linoleum for the floors. It is supposed to make cleaning the floor easier so we went to Endwell Rug in Endwell NY and bought a 12’ x 4 ½’ remnant for $25.00. This is the first change to our plans.

Base of coop.

Base of coop.

Base leveled and covered with linoleum

Base leveled and covered with linoleum

On April 17th our Friend and neighbor Brad Meyer (Meyer Mountain Farms) came down to help with the construction. He has much more experience than we do and very nicely made some suggestions which resulted in some improvements to our coop plans. Instead of framing out two big openings for two nesting boxes, we decided that the openings to the individual boxes will be between the 2” x 4” studs in the walls. We will hang the nesting boxes off of the outside of the coop wall with the openings in the boxes lined up with the spaces between the studs. Brad says that the walls will be stronger this way and it will be easier to construct.
The next change is in the height of the coop. My original plan was for 4’ high walls on one side and 6’ high walls on the other expecting to have to crouch some when I step into the coop to clean it. Now the walls are going to be 6’ on the short side and 8’ on the tall side. No crouching and fewer cuts in the lumber.  

Short wall standing on the base

Short wall standing on the base

Standing the tall wall up on the base

Standing the tall wall up on the base

Once the walls were framed up we stood them up and screwed them to the base. With all of the walls up we put siding on the walls and then the rafters for the roof.

Putting Siding on the Frame

Putting Siding on the Frame

Gerald Peeking over the top of the tall wall as the rafters were being put up

Gerald Peeking over the top of the tall wall as the rafters were being put up

Gerald and Brad placing 2' x 4' boards across the rafters

Gerald and Brad placing 2' x 4' boards across the rafters

Brad Meyer putting boards across the rafters

Brad Meyer putting boards across the rafters

It took 8 hours to get this far. The base built on the 14th, the walls built on the 16th and the siding and rafters put up today the 19th.
We plan to get together again after work on Tuesday the 21st to continue working on the project.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=143
Building Plans for the New Coop http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=122 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=122#comments Sun, 05 Apr 2009 15:39:31 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=122 Some time back I wrote about wanting to design a new coop that would have the nesting boxes off the floor and set up in a way that might help to keep the eggs cleaner. Well it is spring now and time to start building the coop. In order to figure out roughly what materials to order I drew up some rough plans for the new coop.
I originally planned to put this coop on stilts of pressure treated 4’ x 4’s sunk in the ground below the frost line and this is how I made my drawing but every book I read on the subject of building sheds and animal shelters suggests building on 4’ x 4’ s long ways on the ground like skids. So this is what we plan to do instead of what I have drawn here.

Box Platform forms the base of the coop. This will be covered with plywood and the walls will be built on top.

Box Platform forms the base of the coop. This will be covered with plywood and the walls will be built on top.

The basic box platform on which the rest of the structure will be built will be on top of the 4’ x 4’ s on the ground instead of on top of the ends of the 4″ x 4″ posts sticking out of the ground.

One and a half sheets of ply wood will be needed to cover the base of the coop

One and a half sheets of ply wood will be needed to cover the base of the coop

On top of this box platform the walls will be built. On the back wall of the coop we plan to frame in openings from which the laying boxes will be hung/attached.

Frame for back wall with openings for nesting boxes.

Frame for back wall with openings for nesting boxes.

Since we are buying some Bard Rock hens for our Bard Rock rooster and Rhode Island Red Rooster for our Rhode Island Red Hens we will essentially have two flocks. They will need to be kept separate in the coop so there will be a dividing wall inside the coop.

There will also have to be two doors one on each side of the coop to let the two flocks out into their separate yards.

The Front wall with framed openings for chicken doors and center wall to divide coop in half.

The Front wall with framed openings for chicken doors and center wall to divide coop in half.

I will need a way to get into each side of the coop to clean so there will have to be two human size doors hung one on each end of the coop.

Frame for side doors. One on each end of coop to allow the pooper scooper to get in and do her job.

Frame for side doors. One on each end of coop to allow the pooper scooper to get in and do her job.

The roof will be slanted not peaked. I did not draw the short wall that will raise the height of one side of the coop or the framing for the roof. We will cover the roof with ply wood and then metal roofing. Here is a side view of the plans for the coop showing the slanted roof and a cross section of the nesting boxes sticking out.

A simple drawing of the nesting box I have in minde for the new coop

A simple drawing of the nesting box I have in minde for the new coop

From these plans Gerald and I came up with a lumber order (we do not build many things so there isn’t a supply of scrap lumber to work with) which includes the following:

12 - 2″ x 4″ x 12′ boards
46 - 2″ x 4″ x 8′ boards
2 - 4″ x 4″ x 8′ boards
2 - 4″ x 4″ x 12′ boards
2 - 4′ x 8′ x 5/8″ sheets plywood
4 - 4′ x 8′ x 7/16″ sheets plywood
8 - 4′ x 8′ x 1/4″ sheet Lauan plywood
5 - sheet 12′ long galvanized steel roofing
40 - 1″ x 3″ x 8′ furring strips
200 - 1-1/2″ galvanized roofing screws
2 lbs 2 -1/2″ deck screws
3 lbs 1-1/4″ dry wall screws
20′ hardware clothe 48″ wide with 1/4″ openings (to cover vents and prevent predators from geting into coop)

Total cost = $667.78 (Oh Boy! this is not cheep!)

I am sure that we will find that we do not have enough of something or we will not measure something correctly and ruin some materials and have to go back to the lumber yard for more stuff but I think that is part of the adventure.

We bought the materials from a local lumber yard even though it is likely to be more expensive than going to Lowe’s or Home Depot. Our reasoning is that it saves us gas and wear and tear on our vehicle and it gives the business to our local community. With the current economy we want to resist the drive to save pennies if it means that jobs in our back yard would be a risk. Besides when we go into Bisbee’s Lumber in Hancock NY and tell them about our hair brained ideas they never laugh at us and they always give us good advice on how to do what we want better.

They will be delivering our materials on Wed. of next week and I can hardly wait to get started.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=122
Hatching Our Own Eggs http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=107 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=107#comments Sun, 29 Mar 2009 16:56:11 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=107 My husband and I were planning to build an incubator from an old Styrofoam cooler following instructions we downloaded from Home Grown. but once we priced all of the parts including tax and shipping we found that we could buy an incubator for just a little more money. When we priced all the parts we needed to build the incubator we came up with $60.00 without any thermometers or hygrometer or automated egg turner, tax or shipping. We found an incubator which has everything needed including fan and automatic turner for $110.00 plus shipping from Nasco. So as much as we thought we wanted the experience of building our own incubator we decided to go with the Nasco Science incubator Kit. I ordered the Kit 3/29/2008 and started collecting eggs for incubation.

Nasco Incubator Kit

Nasco Science Incubator Kit

Which eggs to collect?

I consulted several sources including “Chickens in Your Backyard” by Rick and Gail Luttmann and “Storey’s Guide to Raising Chickens” by Gail Damerow and a few internet sites like Mississippi State University Extension Service , The Easy Chicken for Beginners , and University of Illinois Extension Incubation and Embryology . All sources agree that the best eggs to collect should come from healthy birds, be of normal size (not super huge and not small) and have a normal shape and come from the nest already clean. Since I do not trap the chickens when they lay I have no way of knowing which eggs come from which chickens but all of my birds look and act healthy to me so I am making the assumption that eggs from any of my birds will be fine.
Size I can do something about. My 10 hens are producing eggs of various sizes so I will collect only the eggs that fit the description “large” which means to me that they fit in the egg cartons for large eggs. I have some that are clearly small for this carton and some that are clearly too large for this carton.
The shape of my hen’s eggs are also somewhat variable. Some of my eggs are more oblong than I think is usual and some have an exaggerated egg shape. Some have rougher surfaces than others. I will select only the eggs that have the typical “egg” shape and a smooth shell.

The Eggs must not be cracked.

I have read that some eggs will have micro fractures which cannot be seen without candling and these should not be used for hatching. We candle with a flash light through a toilet paper tube in a dark room. This is sufficient to show cracks in the shell allowing us to select only eggs without cracks. Candling also reveals the size and shape of the air space in the egg. It is important to use fresh eggs which have small air spaces. It is also important to use eggs with the air space at the large part of the egg.

Candeling an egg making the air space visible

Candeling an egg making the air space visible


In this picture there are no cracks visible and the slightly darker semi circle at the large end of the egg is the air space.

Storing the eggs before incubation.

Since I have only 10 hens that lay 7 to 9 eggs/day and not all of those eggs will make it through the culling process it will be necessary to collect and save eggs over several days or a week before starting the incubation process. Most sources suggest an environment that is draft free not too humid or too dry (not sure what that means) and between 40oF and 60oF. Apparently below 40oF the embryo will die, above 60oF the embryo will start to develop. I am going to try to store my eggs in a Styrofoam container in the garage which tends to stay warm in winter and cool in summer (about 50oF. I will not be controlling humidity this way so I will be taking my chances that the eggs will not dehydrate significantly in the 7 to 10 days it takes to collect enough eggs.

How do I know my eggs are fertilized?

I have a rooster who regularly services my hens (they do not seem to like it much. There is a lot of squawking and complaining going on)but I have been told by a friend who used to raise chickens for show that the Rooster might be “shooting blanks” as he put it or might not be young and strong enough to service all of my hens. One rooster for 10 hens is a reasonable ratio but I still wanted to be sure that most if not all of my eggs are fertilized. We started checking for signs of fertilization when we open eggs to eat. A fertilized egg will have a tiny cloudy white spot (germinal disc) on the yolk perpendicular between the two white stringy structures (Chalazae) which hold the yolk in place in the white of the egg. What we found is that all of the eggs we cracked to eat have a geminal disc so I guess my rooster is doing OK.

This is a picture of a fertilized egg

This is a picture of a fertilized egg


The small whitish circle in this picture is the geminal disc.

So I am now ready to start collecting the eggs.

Today I was able to collect 6 clean eggs but only 5 of them were shaped perfectly. The egg on the right side of the picture bellow was slightly bulbous on the large end and pointier than expected on the narrow end. I used this egg in the picture above to provide a photograph of the geminal disc.

Eggs collected and stored for incubation

Eggs collected and stored for incubation

So I now have 5 hatching eggs waiting for the incubator to arrive. I will collect a few eggs for storage every day until the incubator arrives or I have 12 eggs to hatch whichever comes first.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=107
Raising Meat Birds? Only if someone else does the plucking http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=98 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=98#comments Sat, 21 Mar 2009 15:14:41 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=98 My husband and I have been enjoying our chickens and their eggs so much that we have been thinking about raising a few birds for meat. I personally love to eat chicken. Fried chicken, roast chicken, stewed chicken, chicken soup, chicken pot pie, chicken and dumplings…..There is only one problem with this. There is no way I will ever happily pluck a chicken again.
When I was a teen our father moved us up to the country from Brooklyn. My parents bought a two acre piece of property (the same piece I live on now) and along with some other very cool but kooky projects, started farming. One day our father brought home about 30 really old hens. His objective was to put those birds in the freezer for the winter. None of us had ever worked with chickens before and we were in for an adventure (misadventure might be a better word).
Dad and the boys were outside the house chopping the heads off of the chickens. (My sister and I did not watch this process but I am told it was amazing in a morbidly fascinating way). Anyway when the birds stopped doing what chickens with their heads cut off do, the bodies were brought into the kitchen where Mischele (my sister) and I were waiting. We had a large pot of boiling water on the stove and a huge cardboard box for the feathers. Sitting on a stool next to the pot and in front of the box we were ready for work. Just dip the bird and pluck the feathers. Sounds simple right? We were ready. Holding our first birds by the feet (trying not to think about the fact that there were no heads), we dipped the birds in the boiling water, swung the bodies over the box, grabbed a handful of feathers on the breast of the birds and yanked. The feathers came out easily but out of the space where the feathers were, came a rush of creepy crawly tiny red bugs. Yikes! We both dropped our birds into the box and jumped off of our stools.

A really animated argument ensued. “I am not plucking any more chickens”… “YOU WILL PLUCK THOSE CHICKENS”!… “NO I WONT”…. “YES YOU WILL NOW SIT RIGHT BACK DOWN THERE AND GET BACK TO WORK!”
Horrified but subdued Mischele and I went back to work dipping and plucking and trying really hard to ignore the creepy crawly stuff in the fluff. Dip…Pluck… Dip…Pluck until finally all of the birds were done. (My Head still itches when I think about this)
Well if we had to suffer through that process at least we should enjoy a nice roast chicken dinner after right? So our mother cleaned and dressed two of the freshly plucked chickens and put them in the oven. I was relishing the smells coming from the kitchen I think because I wanted revenge.
In the kitchen waiting in anticipation for the birds to come out of the oven I was standing behind my mother as she pulled the pan out. Something was terribly wrong. Both birds had the legs and wings sticking straight out from their bodies like two day old road kill. Argh! Mom tentatively poked the bird’s wing. It did not give. Then she pulled on it and the entire bird moved in response. Cutting it with a knife proved to be impossible. The things were like hard rubber. I wanted to gloat at my father for making us pluck those birds in the first place but the gloating did not last long because he had a solution. All the birds came back out of the freezer and went into soup pots with lots of onions, carrots, celery, and spices. They simmered most of the night and then put into wide mouth canning jars and pressure canned. We ate those birds all winter long as chicken soup and stew and pot pie. With each chicken meal I thought about the creepy crawly bugs and the stiff as a board roast birds.
So now many many years later I am repeating some of what my father wanted to do. I am growing food on my two acres any way I can and am even about to raise meat birds but there is no way I am going to kill and pluck those birds myself. For $2.00/bird there is a local butcher who will do it for me. Birds will go off in cages and come back ready to cook or freeze and all winter long we will be eating Fried chicken, roast chicken, stewed chicken, chicken soup, chicken pot pie, chicken and dumplings…..Yum I hope!

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=98
To medicate or not to medicate? http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=92 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=92#comments Sat, 07 Mar 2009 14:12:21 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=92 I have one hen that started having a messy bottom about one week ago. The feathers around the vent were caked with moisture and manure. Was she sick? She acted perfectly normal otherwise. She ate, drank, clucked, and cooed just like before. None of the other hens had a messy behind. So was she sick? I don’t know. I waited and watched for three days. There was no change. Then I dosed their water with antibiotic. I hate to do this. I am really anti antibiotic but I was afraid that she might act fine one day and be dead the next. Since adding the medication to her water her messy behind became a little less messy every day. Did the medication help her or did she get better all on her own. I guess I will never know because I did not have the courage to just let nature take its course.
Now I am waiting for the antibiotic to flush out of their systems before I can use the eggs.

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=92
Chicken Business http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=86 http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=86#comments Tue, 17 Feb 2009 22:53:44 +0000 Annie Janauer http://wildaboutchickens.net/?p=86

]]>
http://wildaboutchickens.net/?feed=rss2&p=86